Correction

One correction from yesterday:

The Learning 2.0 Conversation was facilitated by Ben Wilkoff. (I’m not sure how/why I assumed Budtheteacher.) It was a great conversation that I hope continues. Some key points:

1. How do we keep alive the momentum of conversations like this? How do we help them to expand beyond our own community?
2. How the physical structure of schools and classrooms are so indicative of the prevailing Industrial Age model of education.
3. TIE and NECC – possibilities
4. Are we, in our current roles, helping to push and model Learning 2.0?

(Later)

5. What would a Web 2.0 starter package look like for educators just getting their feet wet with all this? Some ideas that were tossed around were Google Reader – frontloaded with a couple of subscriptions (Warlick was mentioned, as he was one of the first bloggers many of us had read), del.icio.us, and Twitter.

Thanks, Ben and all, for a productive Sunday evening!

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One response to “Correction

  • Ian

    1. How do we keep alive the momentum of conversations like this? How do we help them to expand beyond our own community?
    I think you are doing that right now by blogging and sharing. Want proof? I’m in PA. You’re in Denver. Keeping excitement at the local level may be a little more tricky. I’ve notice a bit of a competition between our teachers. I’ve even gone as far as to hand out a monthly award.

    2. How the physical structure of schools and classrooms are so indicative of the prevailing Industrial Age model of education?
    Has anyone ever tried to set up a wireless network in a cinder block school? Enough said.

    3. TIE and NECC – possibilities
    Not going. Too poor.

    4. Are we, in our current roles, helping to push and model Learning 2.0?
    Teacher leaders- yes. Administrators- hopefully.

    5. What would a Web 2.0 starter package look like for educators just getting their feet wet with all this? Some ideas that were tossed around were Google Reader – frontloaded with a couple of subscriptions (Warlick was mentioned, as he was one of the first bloggers many of us had read), del.icio.us, and Twitter.
    Interesting to read that question. We are planning a PD on the last day of school to introduce our teachers to Google Reader and blogs. Until now, they have viewed blogs as something we tech geeks do. I am hoping to show them some real collaborative and instructional value.

    As always, thanks for making me think, Elizabeth.

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